RELATIVE CLAUSES

DEFINING AND NON DEFINING RELATIVE CLAUSES

Non-defining relative clauses
Use
We use non-defining relative clauses to give extra information about the person or thing in the main clause. The extra information is not essential.
Robbie Williams’ Millennium, which is one of his most successful singles, was released in 1999.
Form
In non-defining relative clauses we put a comma before and after the main clause.
We use the relative pronouns who, which, whose, where and when in non-defining relative clauses. The relative pronoun cannot be omitted.
Mark Smith, who lives next door to us, plays in a rock band.
1 Combine the sentences. Use who, which, whose, where or when.
Ivan is very good-looking. (He’s Helen’s brother.)
Ivan, who is Helen’s brother, is very good-looking.
1 The book is about a murder on the Nile.
(It was written by Agatha Christie.)
…………………………………………………
2 The diamond necklace has been found by the police. (It was stolen last week.)
…………………………………………………
3 Steven Spielberg lives in Hollywood. (He is a famous film director.)
…………………………………………………
4 My friend Isabel wants to do media studies.
(Her father is a TV presenter.)
…………………………………………………
5 The new club plays great music. (Jamie works there.)
…………………………………………………
6 My holiday in Ibiza was wonderful. (I first met Jenny then.)
…………………………………………………
7 The new band is very good. (It was formed last year.)
…………………………………………………

Defining relative clauses
Use
We use defining relative clauses to give essential information about the person or thing in the main clause. It tells us which person or thing we are talking about.
This is the CD which everyone is talking about.
Form
There are no commas in defining relative clauses. We can replace who or which with that in defining relative clauses.
She’s the woman that works with my mother.
This is the book that I told you about.
Who, which, that and when can be omitted when they are the object of the verb in the second clause, e.g. There’s the man that the police have been looking for. Whose and where can’t be omitted.

2 Combine the sentences. Use who, which, that, where or when.
That’s the school. I used to go to it.
That’s the school that I used to go to.
1 There’s the girl. I was telling you
about her.
…………………………………………………
2 That was the day. They got married then.
…………………………………………………
3 She’s the girl. Her brother plays in the football team.
…………………………………………………
4 That’s the café. I meet my friends there.
…………………………………………………
5 This is the film. I’ve been waiting to see it
for ages.
…………………………………………………
6 Have you met the girl? She’s going out
with Ted.
…………………………………………………
7 These are the trainers. I bought them yesterday.
…………………………………………………

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: